Connect · Chapter Eight: Moving On

Chapter Eight: Moving On

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After I recovered from my ordeals, I realized that I had learned so much from my experience. My trip had changed, but how was I going to pass on my information? What surfaced was a deep commitment on my part to help others in my predicament just as others had helped me. This is a common reaction for people who have lived through a hard time in their lives. According to psychiatrist, Alfred Adler, our emotional well-being and sense of worth is significantly shaped by how much we make an effective contribution toward society. As survivors, we discover we want to do what we can do to prevent or diminish the devastating after-effects of disease by sharing our stories and those of other people. By helping others, we helped ourselves. From Weathering the Storm: Stories of Hope and Healing pg, 142

Review from Dr. Allen Christiano, 2003 (First printing) “When I opened the book and saw that your work was accepted to be part of a series, I knew that someone else was impressed as I am by your ability to weave essential information around personal stories…I feel pleased to have the opportunity to share and pain and the strength of the men and women who have had these experiences. Every patient needs to know what questions to ask and who can answer them, but this is the only book I have seen that does what I think needs to be done.”

I currently volunteer for the “GetYourRearinGear” Colorectal Cancer fund drive. If they wanted to sponsor this book, would that be possible? They have featured my former book, “When the Trip Changes” for the last few years.

My books are When the Trip Changes and Weathering the Storm printed by Bookmobile. Those two I self-published. I am in the process of writing a fourth book of this series on the recovery process.

I was awarded a position 2013 on the ASG (Affiliated Support Group Advisory Board) of the UOAA (United Ostomy Associations of America. This Sept. I will be on one of their panels and conducting a session on newsletter. In 2008 I was given the “Breaking Boundaries Award” by the Colorectal Cancer Coalition, in “Recognition of (my) Outstanding Achievement and Leadership Contributions in Community Service to the Minneapolis Community.”  

(Excerpts from a Sun Newspaper article in 2009)

As a survivor, Carol Larson is celebrating the fact that today she is cancer-free and has overcome her diagnosis of stage III colorectal cancer fourteen years ago. She acknowledges that every day for a cancer survivor is a gift, and along with this gift comes a sense of appreciation for friends, for family, and for people who have contributed to the success of her journey.

As a speaker, Carol Larson kicked off the American Cancer Society’s “Relay for Life” in 2009 echoing the theme for the relay, “Celebrate, Remember, Fight Back.”

As a member of this community, Carol asked people to remember the valiant people whose lives have been affected by cancer, both the living and the deceased. The luminaries at this event were lit in their honor.

As an advocate, Carol has been rallying others to “Fight Back.” Only through research, further education, and appropriate screening will there be a dent in diminishing this disease. If the American Cancer Society is going to meet its goals, it’s going to take a team-driven community effort to help eliminate the threat of cancer.