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Stonewall Jackson: The Black Man's Friend
ISBN: 9781581825657
 
 
 
 
   
 
  Category: Biographies and Memoirs
CHT
History
United States History
 
  Description: Many historians have touched on Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s relationship with African Americans in light of his Christian convictions. Stonewall Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend explores an aspect of his life that is both intriguing and enlightening: his conversion to Christianity and how it affected his relationship with Southern blacks. Covering the origin of Jackson’s awakening to faith, the book challenges some widely held beliefs, including the assumption that this spiritual journey did not begin until his adulthood. Furthermore, Richard G. Williams Jr. examines a paradox of Jackson’s life: his conversion to Christianity was encouraged by Southern slaves, many of whom he would in turn minister to one day.

Exploring in depth Jackson’s now famous “Colored Sabbath School,” Williams reveals—for the first time—the influence his efforts had on subsequent generations of African Americans. Using original documents, interviews, historical resources, and heretofore unpublished letters and photographs, Williams confirms the veneration with which blacks from Virginia esteemed Jackson, even years after his death—and some to this day. An interview with and photographs of two spiritual descendants of Jackson’s black Sunday-school class adds a real-life connection to this fascinating dimension of the famed general’s life.

The book examines Jackson’s documented youthful pangs of conscience regarding the illiteracy of American slaves—and how Providence ultimately came to use him to have a lasting and positive impact on Southern blacks.